dismiss

Clean Sweep Live Auction on Wed. May 1st. Click to view the full inventory

DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Pediatrics
SEARCH
Posição atual:
>
>
> This Story

Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Health IT Homepage

Journal of AHIMA identifies, surveys and analyzes the current state of Clinical Documentation Improvement

Banner|Aetna selects 98point6 as virtual primary care solution

Dutch Deventer Hospital selects Sectra as its imaging IT vendor

New release of InterSystems HealthShare offers Provider Directory

Missouri Healthcare System deploys Carestream’s PACS, vendor-neutral archive, enterprise viewer

Synaptive Medical reveals automated white matter segmentation feature for Modus Plan Surgical planning tool

iSchemaView’s RAPID approved for use in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

VirtualHealth’s HELIOS Platform achieves NCQA Prevalidation for population health management

ACP releases survey results about telehealth technology availability and use among internists

Diagnotes eliminates communication barriers between patients and providers with launch of new patient app

Could blockchain ensure integrity of clinical trial data?

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style
UC San Francisco researchers have created a proof-of-concept method for ensuring the integrity of clinical trials data with blockchain. The system creates an immutable audit trail that makes it easy to spot any tampering with results -- such as making the treatment look more effective or diminishing side effects.

"Everyone is talking about how blockchain is going to revolutionize many of the data challenges in medicine, and here is one use that finally might make sense," said Atul Butte, MD, PhD, who is the Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg Distinguished Professor and director of the Bakar Computational Health Sciences Institute at UCSF. "We think it could someday be useful for pharma companies running clinical trials."

Story Continues Below Advertisement

THE (LEADER) IN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1982. SALES-SERVICE-REPAIR

Special-Pricing Available on Medical Displays, Patient Monitors, Recorders, Printers, Media, Ultrasound Machines, and Cameras.This includes Top Brands such as SONY, BARCO, NDS, NEC, LG, EDAN, EIZO, ELO, FSN, PANASONIC, MITSUBISHI, OLYMPUS, & WIDE.



The research was published February 22 in Nature Communications.

Blockchain technology utilizes an old computer science technique known as hashing, which creates a unique digital signature for each so-called block of data. The hashes accumulate sequentially, as new data is entered or changed, with each block depending on the last. The resulting "blockchain" creates an audit trail for regulators that is easy to decipher and validate, even without looking at the actual data.

Daniel Wong, a PhD candidate in Biological and Medical Informatics at UCSF, built the system to operate through a web portal, so that each time new data is entered on a given trial participant, the sender, receiver, timestamp, and file attachment containing the data, along with the hash of the previous block of data pertaining to that patient, is recorded onto a new block, with its own distinct signature.

Unlike the decentralized nature of most blockchain applications, this clinical trial prototype depends on having a regulator with centralized authority, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, to operate the web portal, register all parties, and keep a ledger of the blockchain's hashes.

Data, including adverse events, would be reported to the regulatory agency in real time, which may provide a boost to the safety and efficiency of clinical trials. While the prototype makes allowances for data entry or other errors to be corrected, new data can only be appended to the existing chain, without erasing what was there before.

"It makes it really obvious when someone's changing something," Wong said. "You can see who put their hands on it, who made it, who changed it, and who received it."

Wong tested the system with a small subset of data from a real, previously run phase II trial included in ImmPort, a repository of open clinical trial data funded by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) that is managed by Butte's lab and collaborators.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Health IT Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Anuncie
Aumente a Sua Perceção da Marca
Leilões + Vendas Privadas
Comece
O mais melhor preço
Comprar Equipamento/Peças
Encontre
O preço o mais baixo
Notícia diária
Leia
A notícia a mais atrasada
Diretório
Browse tudo
DOTmed Usuários
Ética no DOTmed
Veja o nosso
Programa das éticas
O ouro parte o programa do vendedor
Receba PH
Pedidos
Programa do negociante do serviço do ouro
Receba RFP/PS
Pedidos
Fornecedores de Healthcare
Veja tudo
Ferramentas de HCP
Trabalhos/Treinamento
Achado/suficiência
Um trabalho
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Comece as peças
Citações
Certificado recentemente
Vista recentemente
Usuários certificados
Recentemente Rated
Vista recentemente
Usuários certificados
Central Rental
Equipamento do aluguel
Para menos
Vender Equipamentos/Peças
Comece
A maioria de dinheiro
Preste serviços de manutenção ao Forum dos técnicos
Ajuda do achado
E conselho
Simples RFP
Comece o equipamento
Citações
Mostra de comércio virtual
Serviço do achado
Para o equipamento
O acesso e o uso deste local são sujeitos aos termos e às condições do nosso OBSERVAÇÃO LEGAL & OBSERVAÇÃO DA PRIVACIDADE
Propriedade de e proprietário DOTmeda .com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TODOS OS DIREITOS RESERVADOS