DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Posição atual:
>
> This Story


Início de uma sessão ou Registo to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Women's Health Homepage

Screenings reduce risk of breast cancer death by 47-60 percent: study New research confirms what most physicians have long believed

Could a new technique make ultrasound interpretation easier? Enhanced contrast, considers intensity and duration of echoes

DBT detects 34 percent more cancers than 2D mammo Increased recall rate should not be a concern, expert says

Are women at low risk undergoing unneeded imaging due to dense breasts? Breast density notification laws may have unintended consequences

Is AI a match for manual interpretation of breast density? Study equates algorithm to experienced mammographer

Etta Pisano American College of Radiology names chief research officer

GE to provide training to at least 140 Kenyan radiographers Partnering with Society of Radiography in Kenya

More than 20 percent of insured mammo screenings require some out-of-pocket payment Could prevent screening for lower-income women

GE launches Invenia ABUS 2.0 in US Fifty five percent more efficient in detecting breast cancer than mammography alone

New AI approach identifies recalled but benign mammograms May reduce workload by providing more accurate recall selection

Automated ultrasound guidance streamlines epidural placement for challenging patients in labor

By Dr. Regina Fragneto

It’s no secret that childbirth hurts. For most women, it is characterized by intense pain and pressure in the lower abdomen and back – and for some, this can be overwhelming. Many patients choose relief through epidural analgesia, which involves injection of a local anesthetic near nerve roots in the lumbar spinal region. This inhibits nerve conduction, decreasing sensation in the lower half of the body.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Source-Ray, Inc. - Innovations In Portable X-Ray

SRI is a leading Developer, Manufacturer & Supplier of Innovative Portable Imaging Equipment. We offer Lightweight, Agile, Easy to Maneuver Portable X-Ray Systems ideal for maneuvering in tight spaces. Call us at 631-244-8200



But pain relief itself can hurt. Physicians must caution patients that epidural analgesia can lead to complications and some pain may be associated with the epidural procedure itself, adding to anxiety during an already anxious time. These complications can include spinal headache, which can be severe, and soreness at the site of the epidural. While the risk is minimal for the average patient, in certain populations – among them women with high body mass index (BMI) and scoliosis or other spinal deformities – it may be greater due to technical difficulties associated with the epidural delivery. In addition, problematic anesthesia delivery is painful to the medical system due to increased costs of prolonged procedures and patient discomfort and dissatisfaction.

Even in today’s advanced healthcare age, epidural delivery can be difficult because many anesthesiologists continue to perform the procedure as if they had virtual blinders on. When attempting to pinpoint the optimal site for injection of a powerful drug, they still rely on their sense of touch to assess spinal anatomy. In obese patients and those with spinal anomalies, needle placement is challenging because physicians cannot successfully palpate the spine to determine the appropriate injection site.

Image guidance for epidural placement would remove the physician’s virtual blindfold to improve accuracy. However, many imaging modalities involve X-ray exposure, which should be avoided in a woman carrying a fetus.

Ultrasound, however, involves no radiation, and research has shown the technology helpful in accurately identifying the appropriate epidural injection site. But performing and interpreting ultrasound requires specialized training and experience that is not in some anesthesiologists’ skill set.

Modern technological advances have led to the development of a range of specialized ultrasound devices, including the novel Accuro device by Rivanna Medical (Charlottesville, Virginia). The device applies automated 3D-navigation to spinal ultrasound imaging, eliminating the steep learning curve of interpreting and using ultrasound images to support epidural anesthesia administration. Accuro provides anesthesiologists, regardless of their ultrasound experience, with a clear route to the appropriate epidural site.
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Women's Health Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Anuncie
Aumente a Sua Perceção da Marca
Leilões + Vendas Privadas
Comece
O mais melhor preço
Comprar Equipamento/Peças
Encontre
O preço o mais baixo
Notícia diária
Leia
A notícia a mais atrasada
Diretório
Browse tudo
DOTmed Usuários
Ética no DOTmed
Veja o nosso
Programa das éticas
O ouro parte o programa do vendedor
Receba PH
Pedidos
Programa do negociante do serviço do ouro
Receba RFP/PS
Pedidos
Fornecedores de Healthcare
Veja tudo
Ferramentas de HCP
Trabalhos/Treinamento
Achado/suficiência
Um trabalho
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Comece as peças
Citações
Certificado recentemente
Vista recentemente
Usuários certificados
Recentemente Rated
Vista recentemente
Usuários certificados
Central Rental
Equipamento do aluguel
Para menos
Vender Equipamentos/Peças
Comece
A maioria de dinheiro
Preste serviços de manutenção ao Forum dos técnicos
Ajuda do achado
E conselho
Simples RFP
Comece o equipamento
Citações
Mostra de comércio virtual
Serviço do achado
Para o equipamento
O acesso e o uso deste local são sujeitos aos termos e às condições do nosso OBSERVAÇÃO LEGAL & OBSERVAÇÃO DA PRIVACIDADE
Propriedade de e proprietário DOTmeda .com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TODOS OS DIREITOS RESERVADOS